What’s Wrong with an Alcohol-Based Mouthwash?

The most frequent reason people use an alcohol-based mouthwash is to eliminate bad breath. Ironically, an alcohol-based mouthwash is actually highly ineffective, and even counterproductive, when it comes to long-term treatment of bad breath. While alcohol-based mouthwash products may kill germs in the short term, the high alcohol content reduces the amount of saliva in your mouth, which ultimately makes bad breath worse. Saliva’s primary job is to flush out potentially harmful bacteria making it difficult for the bacteria to stick to your teeth and gums. Saliva is critical to oral health. Without adequate saliva, bad breath will result, while the risk for developing gum disease and cavities increases significantly.

What makes a natural mouth rinse a better choice?

Choosing Dental Herb Company’s alcohol-free mouth rinse over one that is alcohol-based is more effective as a long-term therapy for bad breath and optimal oral health because Tooth & Gums Tonic contains essential oils with powerful antimicrobial qualities for treating the underlying cause rather than merely providing temporary relief. Alcohol-free mouthwashes – also called mouth rinses and tonics – help to maintain the natural balance of saliva. This “balance” is critical not only for breaking down starches and flushing out bacteria, but also for assisting in the body’s natural digestive process. In addition, alcohol dries out the mucous membranes of the mouth, which can exacerbate bleeding gums and lead to increased tooth and gum sensitivity. Natural mouth rinses containing essential oils and herbal extracts can provide antimicrobial and connective tissue rebuilding properties, which can substantially strengthen your healing abilities and overall oral health.  Essential oils have long been recommended for their therapeutic benefits in dental care because they help prevent infection, bad breath, and gum disease without the harmful side effects that are associated with commercial mouthwashes.

Natural herbal mouth rinse products are a safe, effective alternative!

A 2008 study published in the Australian Dental Journal suggested a possible link between the use of alcohol-based mouthwash products and certain oral cancers. Although the study was inconclusive, it drew consumer concern and confusion regarding the safety of alcohol-based mouthwashes. Nonetheless, almost all commercial brand mouthwashes sold in major retail outlets contain significant amounts of alcohol — some as much as 26.9%. While the health risks associated with alcohol-based mouthwashes are not clear, an alcohol and chemical free mouth rinse is less irritating to sensitive gums and tissue, and has proven to be more effective alternative.

Dental Herb Company’s Tooth & Gums Tonic  is a professional strength, alcohol-free mouth rinse. This all-natural mouth rinse is an integrated part of a proven system for optimal oral health. The Dental Herb Company Herbal Protocol for Healthy Teeth and Gums is a non-surgical professional strength herbal antimicrobial system formulated to freshen breath and promote good oral health. Made with precisely calculated proportions of pure essential oils that work synergistically with alcohol-free extracts of organically grown herbs, Dental Herb Company products reduce oral bacteria while helping to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

Restore and maintain your oral health with the all natural efficacy of the Dental Herb Company Herbal Protocol for Healthy Teeth and Gums available through dental and health professionals throughout the United States who have evaluated their efficacy and recommend these products to their patients.

References:

“Time-Tested Botanical Remedies for Modern Periodontal Therapy.” Review. Dentistry Today Oct. 1998: n. pag. Dentistrytoday.com. Dentistry Today. Web. <http://www.dentalherb.com/pdfs/Dentistry-Today-Schechter-Article.pdf>.
McCullough, MJ, and CS Farah. “The Role of Alcohol in Oral Carcinogenesis with Particular Reference to Alcohol-containing Mouthwashes.” Australian Dental Journal 53.4 (2008): 302-05. Web. <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1834-7819.2008.00070.x/abstract>.
“Does Mouthwash Increase the Risk of Oral Cancer?” Fightoralcancer.org. International Oral Cancer Association, n.d. Web. <http://fightoralcancer.org/mouthwash-risk-of-oral-cancer/>